Monday, November 29, 2010

Harvesting My Favorite Root Vegetable-Carrots!

About 1 1/2 weeks ago I thought I would harvest my carrots because the weather was going to turn bitter cold. I was glad I did, because our low temps have been in the single digits for almost a week now...Burrrr! My carrots were the last vegetable growing in my garden, and boy were they worth the wait! Can I just say that it is so rewarding to pull these rich orange, crisp, delectable beauties out of my own garden? As long as you have loose, well-drained soil, they are one of the easiest vegetables to grow.

This carrot variety is called 'Scarlet Nantes.' It is a long, fine-grained carrot that is nearly coreless. It doesn't get woody either.

Bugs Bunny would love this carrot, and so should you!

Aren't the carrots so cute lined up together?

The benefits of growing carrots: good source of fiber, potassium, and vitamin A





Thursday, November 18, 2010

Glorious Fall Foliage

CHANTICLEER FLOWERING PEAR TREE

Plant Facts:
Mature Height
40 - 60 feet
Mature Spread
15 - 20 feet
Soil Type
Widely Adaptable
Moisture
Drought, Heat Tolerant
Mature Form
Upright, Conical
Growth Rate
Rapid
Sun Exposure
Full Sun
Flower Color
White
Fall Color
Red
Foliage Color
Dark Green
Zones
5-8


The Callery Pear tree, Pyrus calleryana, 'callery X Aristocrat cultivar', is a tight, narrow, pyramidal, thornless, ornamental pear tree. Some specimens appear almost columnar in habit. Oval, glossy green leaves turn an attractive reddish purple in autumn. The growth habit is dense, narrowly pyramidal, and evenly branched with crisp glossy green foliage. New growth shows a reddish tint. It has a heavy abundance of single white flowers in the spring and outstanding reddish-orange to purple fall color.
This deciduous tree is a true 4-season tree with white flowers in early spring; shiny, dark green foliage in summer changes to long lasting, dramatic shades of red & purple in mid to late autumn. In winter the tight, narrow form is a refined silhouette in the landscape. Callery Pear trees are very hardy and fast growing. They are an excellent choice for a trouble-free, beautiful addition in any landscape situation.


A few years ago we planted these flowering pear trees along the street so we could have a bit of privacy when we were sitting on our front porch. They have not disappointed us! They provide year-round color. They've also provided homes for the Robins that nest in the spring. These trees truly morph from green to deep reddish purple to gold, orange, and red and not at the same time. Aren't they gorgeous?

OCTOBER GLORY RED MAPLE

The October Glory Red Maple tree, Acer rubrum 'October Glory', is one of the best and most popular of the Red Maple cultivars. October Glory Red Maple trees are excellent for intense fall color and have a medium to fast growth rate. In the spring, red flowers in dense clusters form before the leaves. This Red Maple is an excellent tree for lawn or street planting.
The 'October Glory' Red Maple has a good oval-rounded form. It tends to hold its lustrous dark green leaves late into fall. The intensity of the brilliant orange to red fall color is worth the wait. October Glory Red Maple trees have a dense oblong head with dark green foliage. Excellent color for many regions.


Plant Facts:
Mature Height
25 - 50 feet
Mature Spread
25 - 35 feet
Soil Type
Widely Adaptable
Moisture
Drought Tolerant
Mature Form
Broad, Round
Growth Rate
Rapid
Sun Exposure
Full Sun - Partial Sun
Flower Color
Small Red
Fall Color
Red, Orange, Yellow
Foliage Color
Green
Zones
5-8

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Limelight Hydrangea in the Fall

Remember those beautiful Limelight hydrangeas that I posted pictures of in August? Well, I mentioned in that post that an added bonus you get with these flowers comes in the Fall when the tips of the flower petals turn a gorgeous pink! I love it when plants are repeat bloomers or bloom for a long time like this one.



Growing up in the southern part of the United States exposed me to plants that I love. Generally speaking, most of those plants love acidic soil and we have alkaline soil here in Utah. Plants like hydrangeas, camellias, gardenias, magnolias, etc. remind me of home. It's difficult or impossible to grow some of these plants here because of our colder, drier, arid climate. I was so pleased to find these hydrangeas a few years ago. They "tap" into my southern roots.